Holiday Gifts – For YOU!

I have the warmest memories of Christmas at my grandparent’s home in San Jose, California (if you’re LDS, imagine Christmas in the temple—with lots of goodies!). My Grandfather would gather us and read the Christmas story in Luke 2. We would sing, play games, and exchange gifts. My favorite treat was the rocky road candy my grandmother made with marshmallows and nuts covered in chocolate.

This year, I’m participating in a Christmas Giveaway Dec. 11th – 18th. You can visit a selection of super authors, download their FREE books, and enter to win a $60 Amazon gift card. You can even enter if you are in the UK! I am offering two free ebooks (pick one): Anna’s Prayer: The True Story of an Immigrant Girl and Muffy & Valor: A True Story of my own dog (see blogs below). Contact us here and put an A (for Anna) or an M (for Muffy) after your name: http://premiopublishing.com/about-contact.php)

THREE more of my ebooks are free for everyone on Kindle this month: The Bridge of the Golden Wood: A Parable on How to Earn a Living (selected for curricula by the State of Vermont), Why Juan Can’t Sleep: A Mystery, and Polar Bear Bowler: A Story Without Words#diversekidlit

To enter the contest for the $60 Amazon Gift Card (Dec. 11 – 18, 2017) simply:

  1. Visit each blog (BELOW).
  2. Leave a comment.
  3. Click on the Rafflecopter link at the bottom of this page.

*NOTE: Books given below are NOT intended for all ages!*
Blog schedule (Go to these on the appropriate dates for prizes & chance at a gift card):
Dec. 11 – Lois Winston: Killer Crafts & Crafty Killers Blog 
FREE BOOK: Elementary, My Dear Gertie
​​Dec. 12 – Catherine Green, Author
FREE BOOK: Christmas with the Vampires
​Dec. 13 – Stanalei Fletcher Blog
FREE BOOK: Tell It Like It Is
Dec. 14 – Doree Anderson Blog
Dec. 15 – Kathryn E. Jones​ Blog
FREE BOOK: Tie Died
Dec. 16 – Karl Beckstrand’s Multicultural Books Blog (you’re here now!)
FREE BOOK: Anna’s Prayer OR Muffy & Valor
Dec. 17 – Marie Higgins Blog
​FREE BOOK: A Thrill of Hope
December 18, 2017 – Mary Martinez’s Garden Blog
FREE BOOK: Profit (Book V The Beckett Series)

Rafflecopter giveaway link

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Anna’s Prayer Re-released

Almost ten years ago, I was getting ready for my wedding (which I, ultimately, didn’t attend). A publisher approached me about writing a non-fiction story about an immigrant child. I told them I had such a story in my family history. Former LDS Relief Society General President Bonnie Parkin had, in a General Conference talk, told the story of my Great-great Aunt Anna, who immigrated from Sweden as a child—without her parents. I had more details in my Great Grandmother Ida’s journal.

I contacted Sister Parkin and asked if we could collaborate. While she had other priorities on her plate, she sent me copies of Anna Matilda Anderson’s journal (Anna is her husband’s grandmother) and told me I could use it as I pleased.

It was fun to compare my great grandmother’s perspective to her sister’s. Each had her own miraculous experience in her youth, which bolstered their new-found faith. Each had frightening experiences traveling without parents—separating mid-journey to live in different states.

BYU illustration graduate Shari Griffiths was asked to illustrate the story once it was complete. While Shari and I each got painful educations in the publishing process, she did an outstanding job on the art.

The result was Anna’s Prayer, the true story of 10-year-old Anna, who arrived alone in Salt Lake City—not knowing anyone and unable to speak English. Alone in the train station in the middle of the night she prayed for someone who could speak Swedish to come to her aid. The answer to her prayer went beyond what she could have hoped.

The book was well received and sold out in some local Costco stores. After a few years, publishing rights to Anna’s Prayer reverted to me and illustration rights to Shari (who now has several active children—and no desire to illustrate). This year, I purchased rights to the artwork and, finally, have re-released Anna’s Prayer in more affordable, paperback and ebook versions. I’m now working on my great grandmother’s story—as a prequel to Anna’s. I’m so excited to tell this—also true—story to the world! Here are some links to Anna’s Prayer: http://gozobooks.com/annas-prayer.php       http://tinyurl.com/zgnb5ka

Family Stories

This month I shared with librarians around the country my adventures in Family History. Where is your family from? How can your personal or family story impact others? People of all ages find inspiration from the biographies of great men and women who faced difficulties. What many people don’t realize is that within their own families are stories of great courage and resilience. I grew up hearing the dry names of people I didn’t know—dates and places—that kind of bored me. But I also heard their stories. THAT always got my attention. My ancestors include pilgrims, Mormon pioneers, and possibly American Indians. I’m preparing the second book in a series on ancestors who immigrated to America as children. My roots are South African, Swedish, Scottish, Irish, and English. I read that a young man in prison said (after learning about his heritage), ‘Had I known who I am—who I came from—I would never had ended up here.’ Knowing where/who you come from can change you.

To start go from the known to the unknown. Find your oldest living relative and interview him/her!

  • Prepare questions prior
  • Audio/video record it!
  • Take notes too (for unplanned questions—and technology backup)
  • Start with geography
  • Have fun being a detective!

Research ONE person at a time (but know a few family names, in case you stumble across Uncle Bob. Names are often repeated across generations). Know town, township/city, county, state, region, and country of origin (where possible. Sometimes towns disappear, counties split or merge, and countries’ borders shift—be sure any map you look at is from the correct era). Sometimes, just by Googling a name and place, you find gems.

Before governments kept records, they were mostly collected in:

  • Church records (birth, death, marriage, ordination, bar mitzvah, adoption, service, cemetery/headstones)
  • Family Bible, photo albums, scrapbooks
  • Family letters & heirlooms
  • Diaries/journals/biographies (DAR, DUP. Don’t overlook those of siblings, cousins, etc.)
  • Announcements, phone books, bills, organization directories

The best records are official (and can substantiate or disprove rumors)

  • City/county/national records: Census, military, Social Security Index, taxes
  • Certificates: education, awards, achievement
  • Wills, deeds, lawsuits/probate/court cases/jails
  • Immigration records, passenger lists
  • Business records/lists, hiring/promotions
  • Adoption/orphanage or hospital records
  • News articles, obituaries, event ads, museums
  • Bank/Insurance records, ledgers
  • Funeral/cemetery records (headstones too)

Historical & genealogical societies can be more helpful than city/county/state clerks. Find them online (also family tree-building sites):

Queries: It is NOT unusual for a stranger to happily search records—even headstones in local cemeteries for you (offer to cover copy/travel costs). Families often have official sites or Facebook pages, you can query those page owners too. Have friends or family in an ancestral place (you’re not in)? Ask if they’ll look up data/certificates/headstones for you. When all else fails, consider hiring a professional genealogist (or get free help at any LDS Family History Center. Ask for a tour. Become a volunteer indexer).

What do you do with the data?

  • Put copies of everything in your binder (pedigree chart, family group sheets, individual timelines, and a source/research log)
  • Share it on Ancestry.com and/or a specific family site (create one if you want)
  • Have a reunion to meet, swap stories, share data, and get emails for ongoing collaboration
  • Set up a family site/FB page
  • Publish it as an ebook and even physical book (for posterity—and even the world)

Dead men (and women) tell no tales. Document your own history. On a sheet of paper, write the year of your birth and then (a few spaces down) write the year ten years after that (add ten and ten … until the present). Fill in major events, and you’ll soon have a quick outline of your life. Here are some data ideas (also good for interviewing relatives):

  • Birth date/place, Christening/baptism
  • Siblings, education, special/funny experiences
  • Marriage, career, military, hobbies, travel
  • Affiliations, talents, accomplishments, volunteer work, church service
  • Children
  • Places lived (where died/buried)

If you’d like more info on publishing your story. There is a free audio here: KarlBeckstrand.com/Presentations